Kennel cough and vets

An article from NBCMontana.com describes a kennel cough outbreak in dogs in Bozeman, Montana. It's a pretty basic article that outlines a rather typical presentation of kennel cough (now largely referred to as canine infectious respiratory disease complex - a respiratory infection that can be caused by a range of viruses, bacteria and Mycoplasma).

As part of the story, they state that if you have a sick dog, the "best course of action is to call your local veterinarian and get medication." I realize it's a quick statement, perhaps tossed in without much consideration, but there are some important issues to consider.

Should someone call a veterinarian and get medication, or should a veterinarian actually see the dog?

  • Sometimes dogs just need to be given time and rest. Viruses are often the cause of this condition, and it just takes time for the infection to resolve (just like person with a cold virus). If that's the case, a little over-the-phone veterinary advice might be fine. If drugs are needed, then the dog needs to go to a veterinarian. Affected dogs might need something to control cough, which need to be given by prescription, and occasionally antibiotics are needed, but in either case a veterinarian needs to see the dog first. If the dog is sick enough that it needs additional treatment above and beyond this, then of course it needs to be seen by a veterinarian.

Are there any problems with a dog like this going to the veterinarian?

  • Here's where the ball often gets dropped. The last thing we want to see is someone walking through the from door with a hacking, biohazardous dog who goes nose-to-nose with other dogs in the waiting room, breathes on half of the surfaces in the room, sits there for ten minutes while waiting for the appointment, and gets handled by every staff member before they realize the dog might be infectious. A situation like that can turn a veterinary clinic into a source of infection for many other dogs, and help an outbreak spread.

A very basic but well coordinated approach can greatly reduce the risk of dogs infecting other dogs in the clinic. These would include:

  • Not taking a biohazardous dog into the waiting room. The owner can call from the car upon arrival or come in without the dog to let the clinic know they're there.
  • The dog can be admitted directly into isolation or an exam room, thereby avoiding contact with other animals in the waiting room or elsewhere in the clinic.
  • Veterinarians and techs that are going to work with the dog can know in advance and come in prepared, wearing appropriate protective outerwear (e.g. gloves and a labcoat or gown that they use for only that appointment) to prevent contamination of their clothing or body.

Very easy to do. Probably very effective too, but often not done.

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