The COVID-19 pandemic has put a lot of strain on a lot of people, and those in the veterinary profession are no exception.  Thank you, Captain Obvious.  Self-care and mental health support at times like these are critical, but can be hard to come by for many still working on the front lines in clinics,

In Ontario, veterinary medicine is considered essential, but is currently restricted to “urgent” care only. What constitutes “urgent” is a grey zone. We’ve avoided trying to create a comprehensive list of “what veterinarians should and shouldn’t do” because there are so many factors and nuances to consider in every individual case.  Instead, we’ve focused

Shortages of personal protective equipment (PPE) are a problem in many places right now because of massive demand (as well as hoarding and black market diversion) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Veterinary clinics facing shortages need to think about ways to extend the life of existing supplies, including conservation, extended use or reuse of items when

During my (limited) ventures outside of home or the College, it’s getting more common to see people walking around wearing nose-and-mouth masks.

My first thought is “Where are you getting those? They’re short in supply.

My next thought is “Stop wasting masks! You don’t need them.

My last one is “

Updated April 6: Revised guidance document

Ontario announced a shutdown of non-essential services yesterday.  Wisely, veterinary medicine was classified as essential. However, it’s not business as usual. Rather, it’s “best as we can” given other restrictions and social distancing that are absolutely necessary to curb the spread of COVID-19. There’s no clear way to