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When an unvaccinated person is exposed to rabies, they typically receive post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) consisting of a dose of anti-rabies antibodies and four (4) rabies vaccines over the course of two weeks. In dogs and cats, it’s a different story. We don’t use formal PEP protocols in pets in most regions.

  • Why not? I’m not

When we talk about “worms” in dogs or cats, we’re usually talking about parasites that can infect pets or (less commonly) that harbour other pathogens. However, there are also certain worms that can cause other problems for our furry friends. For example, the hammerhead flatworm (Bipalium adventitium) produces a very potent paralytic neurotoxin

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The UK’s FIP Advice Team has released new antiviral drug treatment guidelines for feline infectious peritonitis (FIP).

A major change is introduction of twice daily dosing of oral GS-441524, based on the observation that inter-cat variations in drug absorption and metabolism might account for some of the treatment failures that are seen with once daily

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Great news for Canadian veterinarians, cat owners and cats: We now have legal access to drugs that can treat feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a disease that’s historically been considered almost invariably fatal in cats, prior to the discovery of these very treatments.

I’ll keep this short (-ish… since Moe keeps complaining about my long posts).

In the first two parts of this series, I explained a lot of the changes that have been made to the CLSI veterinary antimicrobial susceptibility testing guidelines, specifically those related to staphylococci and Enterobacterales (which includes E. coli and friends).  There’s less to say about Pseudomonas, but these changes will impact our