With any new, changing or inadequately investigated infectious disease, we need to understand scope of the problem, and that includes the range of species that can be infected. The ongoing human monkeypox outbreak has raised concern about spillback of monkeypox virus into animals from humans since we don’t know much about susceptible animal species.

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Things have been pretty quite regarding monkeypox in domestic animals lately. Whether that’s because human-to-animal infection is truly rare, and human case numbers are dropping, or whether it’s because there’s not enough surveillance in domestic animals that have been exposed to the virus isn’t clear. I suspect it’s a combination of the two. Our surveillance

As H5N1 avian flu ramps up again across Canada with the fall wild bird migration, we’re likely going to see more situations where more unique populations of captive birds are affected, beyond the usual large or small poultry flocks. The CFIA’s standard response to highly pathogenic avian flu (like the current H5N1 strain) is “

If you follow zoonotic diseases, you might look at the title of this post and think “What is he rehashing now? We already know Salmonella is common in reptiles, and contact with reptiles is a major risk factor for salmonellosis in people.

In large part, you’d be right. Not a lot has changed