One concept that we’ve recommended for COVID-19 control in veterinary clinics is staff cohorting. That involves keeping staff groups together to limit the risk of transmission should someone be infected. If groups (i.e. shifts, or teams that stick together and don’t interact with others) are formed, any single infected person would have contact with a

There is still lots of confusion about what use of different types of masks is supposed to do in different situations. As I’ve said before, it comes down to thinking about who the mask is meant to protect – the user, or people around the user. This dictates what type of mask should be used.

We’re nowhere near the end of this pandemic, and one concern we have is opening things up too quickly and losing the benefits of all the sacrifices that have been made to “flatten the curve.” As restrictions get lifted, we’re not going straight from “now” to “normal.”  We’ll have to continue with good physical distancing

This is a departure from our normal emphasis, but COVID-19 in developing countries is an important yet often overlooked issue.  Here’s a guess post from a colleague, Dr.  Philip Mshelbwala, who’s from Nigeria but currently studying in Australia:

The challenges of combating novel coronavirus COVID-19 in Developing World: The need for a workable strategy

Philip

The COVID-19 pandemic has put a lot of strain on a lot of people, and those in the veterinary profession are no exception.  Thank you, Captain Obvious.  Self-care and mental health support at times like these are critical, but can be hard to come by for many still working on the front lines in clinics,

In Ontario, veterinary medicine is considered essential, but is currently restricted to “urgent” care only. What constitutes “urgent” is a grey zone. We’ve avoided trying to create a comprehensive list of “what veterinarians should and shouldn’t do” because there are so many factors and nuances to consider in every individual case.  Instead, we’ve focused