antimicrobial resistance

I’ve written (ranted?) about this before – namely the misuse of antimicrobials intended for treatment of aquarium fish in other species. Usually such posts are followed by a deluge of nasty emails along with a bunch of curious requests for links to fish antibiotic sellers (8% kickback available!).

Another sponsorship request came in this morning

How do I link all those? It’s not as big of a stretch as you might think, but it’s definitely getting into some theoretical components.

Dogs are unique from a Lyme disease perspective in that healthy individuals are very commonly tested.

Hundreds of thousands of dogs get tested every year for heartworm, and common heartworm

I’ve spent a lot of time in meetings listening to people debating whether to use the word “antibiotic” vs “antimicrobial.” I tend to stay out of those discussions because I don’t care too much either way.

  • Yes, they mean somewhat different things.
  • Yes, we want to be precise when writing guidance documents where the difference

If you follow zoonotic diseases, you might look at the title of this post and think “What is he rehashing now? We already know Salmonella is common in reptiles, and contact with reptiles is a major risk factor for salmonellosis in people.

In large part, you’d be right. Not a lot has changed

There have been calls to develop antibiotics that are just for use in animals, the idea being to have separate antibiotics for animals and people, so that antimicrobial resistance that develops as a result of antibiotic use in animals won’t impact people.

Makes sense, right?

It does, at least at first glance. However, “makes sense”